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Tactical Resources In American Democracy
Wednesday, 15 December 2004
Way Too Many Coincidences.....
The only direct tie to the Ohio based Triad GSI is the Citrus Times article (bottom of blog) from 1992, in which the validity of Triad GSI's software used in FL in the 1988 election is questioned. But I recommend taking a look at and further investigating everything below. Other than the Citrus Times article, most of the following is regarding a Triad company that was used to illegally finance millions to Republican campaigns in the 90s and several other activities that raise some serious questions. With this Triad, I haven't found a direct link to the 2004 election, but every path I follow leads to either elections, software, computer programming or something very suspicious.....

CITRUS TIMES
Words war expands to computer charge
GREG HAMILTON
30 August 1992
St. Petersburg Times

The war of words between Lisa Beville and the woman she hopes to unseat, Supervisor of Elections Wilma Anderson, has expanded to include the state Division of Elections and Triad GSI, the company that supplies the county's ballot-counting machinery.

In a series of letters to Anderson, Beville, who is challenging her former boss in Tuesday's Democratic primary, recently questioned the validity of the computer software, the security of the ballots and events surrounding the 1988 primary.

According to Beville, Triad workers adjusted the software to clear up a ballot-counting problem shortly before the election and the machinery should have been recertified following the work.
She said Friday that when she mentioned this to Anderson, she was told "to mind my own business, that I don't need to recite election law to the supervisor."

"I don't remember saying that," Anderson said Friday. "If I had, she probably would have told me to f--- off, as she did on other occasions. I'm not saying it didn't happen, I just don't remember it happening."

Anderson said that in 1988, the Triad workers were fixing problems with the machines caused by a lightning strike. Triad president Tod Rapp concurred in a letter to Anderson.
Beville disputes that the weather had anything to do with the repair work.

But even it if did, "My question is, why was it a secret? The party chairmen were not called in. The canvassing board was not notified. The Division of Elections was not notified.

"Why was I forbidden to mention it? If the party chairmen and division had been notified, it may not have been a big deal. But it should have been made public. Everyone has a right to know."

Beville said state law allows minor changes, such as correcting misspelled names on the ballot, to occur without the supervisor having to get the system recertified. But if the computer program is altered, which she claims is what occurred in 1988, the tabulation system must be recertified.

However, a memorandum from the Division of Elections seems to contradict that. It reads: "Modification of the election system software would require recertification; however, modification of parameters is not the same as a modification of the election system. . . . Modification and creation of election parameters is a normal operation which must occur for each election on all systems."

Beville also reiterated her concerns about ballot security. The ballots, she said, are left out where anyone has access to them. "We've been fortunate, no one has taken any ballots. But the opportunity has been there. The lack of security is evident."
Anderson has stated that the ballots are secure.

Beville noted that she addressed her letters to Anderson, not the newspapers. "I'm not out to sling mud at her," she said, adding it was Anderson who made the letters an issue by calling them "harassment" at a recent candidates forum.
Document stpt000020011108do8u0151u




Triad, or Tactical Resources in American Democracy was founded in 1995, Triad was a profit-making company that funnelled money into Congressional races through two tax-exempt groups associated with it, mainly Citizens for Reform and Citizens for the Republic Education Fund.

Neither of the two nonprofit groups associated with Triad was active before the 1996 election. One existed only on paper as of Oct. 11, 1996, when it opened a bank account.

In the next 20 days, from Oct. 11 to Oct. 31, the group, Citizens for Reform, received $1.6 million from Triad donors in 12 bank transactions. By Oct. 31, $1.4 million of this money had been spent on advertisements, documents show. A second Triad-affiliated nonprofit group received $1.7 million in late October for television attack advertisements.

Triad raised money from conservative donors and sent it to the nonprofit groups that bought so-called issue advertisements on television attacking Democrats and supporting Republican candidates and causes.

Mr. Braden said some Triad donors had been so concerned about secrecy that they insisted on having written agreements with Triad that their names would not be disclosed unless Triad was ordered to do so by the courts. Still, Mr. Braden said, the majority of Triad's donors had been primarily attracted by the conservative candidates that Triad supported and less by a promise of anonymity.


Washington Post On Triad

Other Article On Triad

Between the above sources and the ones below, three Triads are mentioned. At some point in the various articles, a characteristic of one would mean it is the same as another, meaning they are all the same thing?

Others Linked To This Triad: Cooperative Computing Inc. merged with Triad, becoming Cooperative Computing Inc/Triad or CCI/Triad.

Edgington Oil Co. CCI/Triad sold it for roughly $175 Mil. To Stay In Business

Odyssey Online, LLC, by Cox, Keller & Rowland, 85 W. Main St., Xenia, 453852913; members: Tod A. Rapp
C, K & R

Could someone who knows about the technology associated with voting machines see if anything on these links is fishy:
Link
Software Consultants (Link to CCITriad-Jeff Wheeler)

These guys claim to have the most comprehensive product on the market today:
http://capitoladvantage.com/elections.html
I found this by clicking to register to vote in any state on another site, which took me here:
Capital Advantage

If you delete everything past the .com, it goes to the capitaladvantage site. Thought it was weird that the site you could supposedly register at was the ssl.capwiz and that if you include congress in the address, but delete anything after that, it goes to congress.org.

Though the name is different, the Triad mentioned in this article, Triad America, mentions ownership of Edgington Oil Co., as did the previously mentioned one; Triad Management Systems?

Copyright 1987 The Financial Times Limited
Financial Times (London,England)
February 4, 1987, Wednesday

Personal and business creditors are closing in on Mr Adnan Khashoggi, the Saudi arms dealer who claims to have lost millions of dollars from financing the secret sale of US weapons to Iran.
In the last month alone the man often (wrongly) described as the worlds richest has been brought down to earth with a bump. Two of his private airliners containing nearly Dollars 1 m worth of crystal and china were grounded in France following his default on Dollars 7.5 m of debts to Mr Roland ("Tiny") Rowland and to Mr Rowland's company, Lonrho
---SNIP---
If his private wealth is hidden, his business affairs are coming increasingly into the open because of the suits piling up against Triad America, based in Salt Lake City, Utah.

As the pressure mounts, former Khashoggi aides have been bewailing the failure of the North American businesses to realize Mr Khashoggi's dream - as he described it to Time magazine last month - "to take over an important American company and use it as a base of my operations."

In its filing under Chapter 11 of the US brankruptcy law, Triad has declared assets of Dollars 116.4 m and liabilities of Dollars 51 Million it had hoped to wipe the slate clean by selling its best asset, Edgington Oil, which has a refinery at Long Beach.


Much of the above was found using LexisNexis through my University. So if you do not have that or something similar, a google search doesn't retrieve some of it, but I'd be happy to get anyone more of the original source, though the relevant parts are above, as well as a link or the article info for LexisNexis.

Posted by ignorantusa at 5:17 PM EST
Updated: Wednesday, 15 December 2004 7:30 PM EST
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